401(k) plans robbing Americans in broad daylight

The list of disgusting financial scams practices perpetrated against ordinary Americans by financial institutions with the tacit approval of bribe-taking campaign contribution-soliciting Washington, DC legislators is astonishing.

60 Minutes covered one of them this week:

“There clearly has been a raid on [401(k)] funds by the people of Wall Street. And it’s cost the savers and the future retirees a lot of money that would otherwise be in their account, independent of the financial collapse,” Rep. George Miller [D-CA] said.

Congressman Miller is chairman of the House Committee on Education and Labor, and a staunch critic of the 401(k) industry, especially its practice of deducting more than a dozen undisclosed fees from its clients' 401(k) accounts.

“Now you got a bunch of economic wizards jumping in and taking money out of your retirement plan, and they don’t wanna tell you how much, you can’t decipher it in simple English, and they’re not interested in disclosing it, or having any transparency about it,” Miller told Kroft.

“And most of the people that look at their 401(k)s have no idea that these fees are being taken out?” Kroft asked.

“No. Where would you find it? Where would you find these fees in this prospectus? You can look on any page you want, and when you’re all done reading it, and you will find some of the fees and the commissions here, but you won’t find them all, and I’ll bet you won’t find half of ‘em,” Miller said.

There are legal fees, trustee fees, transactional fees, stewardship fees, bookkeeping fees, finder’s fees. The list goes on and on.

Miller’s committee has heard testimony that they can eat up half the income in some 401(k) plans over a 30-year span. But he has not been able to stop it.

“We tried to just put in some disclosure and transparency in these fees. And we felt the full fury of that financial lobby,” he said.

The worst part of this is that lack of transparency encourages a race-to-the-bottom. If 401(k) investors can’t distinguish between “good” mutual funds charging reasonable fees and “bad” ones, funds that want to be “good” must resist strong financial temptations to be “bad.”

Posted by James on Sunday, April 19, 2009