Will Gulf of Mexico and Florida's east coast become massive dead zone?

I almost never post unsourced news, but the official news about the Gulf of Mexico oil disaster has been consistently wrong (happy talk), so I’m going to pass along information coming, supposedly, from a BP insider. This could be bogus but sounds horrifyingly plausible:

A BP insider, providing information to OpEdNEws.com, reports that scientists and engineers, fearing the worst, have envisioned a worst case scenario, “It could very well be that the entire Gulf and the East coast of Florida could become dead zones, with no aquatic life at all.”

…According to my source, the Macondo oil field, owned/leased by BP— the one where the well is spewing a “volcano” of oil, at what some experts estimate, based on oil slick size reported by NOAA, the leak is “throwing off 25-26,000 barrels a day.” That’s over a million gallons a day, far more than the 200,000 most media organizations are reporting. Reportedly, when the oil was pumping out of the well, at the surface, it was coming out at a rate of 8,000 barrels a day. That means that, without pumping, just from the pressure within the well, after rising through 5,000 feet of ocean water, there was still 8,000 barrels a day of pressure. This suggests that the release at sea-floor level would be far greater. My source reports that the pressure in the well was reported to be 135-165,000 PSi. That’s massive.

In addition, the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig sunk with 770,000 gallons of diesel fuel on board. That may also be leaking.

The real danger, my source reports, is that the pipe and incomplete well-head will deteriorate as the highly pressurized mix of oil, dirt and rock that is spewing out of the wellhead abrades the ten inch pipe, then the 24 inch wellhead. If that happens things will get much worse. There are an estimated 44 million barrels of oil reserve in the Macondo oil field— about 1.8 billion gallons.

According to my source, the leaking Macondo field oil well is one of about a dozen mile deep wells BP has drilled. None of them have backup remote activation acoustic blow-out preventers.

Posted by James on Sunday, May 09, 2010